Read The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway Online

The Old Man and the Sea

It is the story of an old Cuban fisherman and his supreme ordeal: a relentless, agonizing battle with a giant marlin far out in the Gulf Stream. Using the simple, powerful language of a fable, Hemingway takes the timeless themes of courage in the face of defeat and personal triumph won from loss and transforms them into a magnificent twentieth-century classic. ...

Title : The Old Man and the Sea
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780684830490
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 132 pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Old Man and the Sea Reviews

  • Madeline

    "There isn't any symbolism. The sea is the sea. The old man is an old man. The boy is a boy and the fish is a fish. The sharks are all sharks no better and no worse. All the symbolism that people say is shit. What goes beyond is what you see beyond when you know."

    -Ernest Hemingway

  • Fatima

    داستان جذابیت خاصی نداشت , هرچند من عاشق ماهیگیری هستم و خب فضای داخل داستانش باعث شد تا انتها روند عادی اش را تحمل کنم و کتاب را بخوانم اما این دلیلی نمیشود بر اینکه بگویم خیلی خوب بود و یا عالی بود ! در عوض یک داستان کاملا متوسط و چه بسا رو به پایین به حساب میامد که انتظارش را نداشتم و فکر میکردم بهتر از این حرف ها باشد که نبود و کتاب را بعد خواندن اخرین صفحه اش با نارضایتی بستم و کنار گذاشتم ... این را هم بگویم که دلم برای پیر مرد داستان سوخت که زحمتش اینطور به هدر رفت و دست تنها این همه سختی ...more

  • Ahmad  Ebaid

    "لماذا يستيقظ من تقدمت بهم السن مبكرا !! ألكي يفوزوا بيوم أطول عن الآخرين"


    والجملة السابقة من الرواية, تلخص شعور ارنست همنجواي في سنين كهولته .

    **

    هناك الكثير من الكلام يدور عن الرواية والرمزية التي بها, والحقيقة أنا لم أحست بأي رمزية فيها أبدا, هي قصة حلوة جدا عشت فيها كل لحظة مع "سانتياجو" وصراعه.

    **

    دكتور جابريال وهبة ملخصها مع تحليل نقدي رائع, وأقتبس منه:

    "أما الرمز في قصص همنجواي فلا يدخل وعي القاريء كرمز أبدا"


    و هذا تقريبا السبب لعدم إحساسي بالرمز, و لما اخذ نوبل للآداب عنها كنموذج للعمل الأدبي ا
    ...more

  • Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽



    So, reading this book was my personal penance for reading a rather silly YA fantasy freebie, Obsidian. If I read something particularly shallow and brainless, I try to balance it out with a classic or something that makes me actually use my brain cells.

    At first Hemingway's typical simple, spare prose and his testosterone-fueled values were getting on my nerves. Digression here: one of the funnier things I've read was a piece on McSweeney's titled "Toto's 'Africa' by Ernest Hemingway". If you kno

    His head spun from whiskey and soda. She was a damned nice woman. It would take a lot to drag him away from her. It was unlikely that a hundred men or more could ever do such a thing. The air, now thick and moist, seemed to carry rain again. He blessed the rains of Africa. They were the only thing left to bless in this forsaken place, he thought—at least until she set foot on the continent. They were going to take some time to do the things they never had.

    He stood on the tarmac and watched as the plane came in for its landing. He heard the sound of wild dogs crying out into the night. The man thought the dogs sounded desperate, perhaps having grown restless and longing for some company. He knew the feeling.
    Anyway, I'm reading sentences in this book like "They sat on the Terrace and many of the fishermen made fun of the old man and he was not angry," and I'm thinking, I'm just going to have to make myself power through this. But gradually this story sucked me in, and I could feel the nobility in both the old man and the immense fish. I had sympathy for old Santiago and his physically and mentally excruciating battle against the marlin (view spoiler).

    The Christ imagery toward the end was interesting, if not subtle. For example:
    He started to climb again and at the top he fell and lay for some time with the mast across his shoulder. He tried to get up. But it was too difficult and he sat there with the mast on his shoulder and looked at the road.
    There's a lot more (his poor hands!), and it was moving even if I'm not completely buying everything Hemingway is selling. It's clear that the old man has gone through a shattering experience and has come through it, if not having defeated the forces of death, still with a huge personal victory.

    I'm going to digress a little here again, and get a bit personal, but I'm reminded as well of an old poem, "Gethsemane" by Ella Wheeler Wilcox, that ends:
    All paths that have been, or shall be,

    Pass somewhere through Gethsemane.

    All those who journey, soon or late,

    Must pass within the garden’s gate;

    Must kneel alone in darkness there,

    And battle with some fierce despair.

    God pity those who cannot say,

    “Not mine but thine,” who only say,

    “Let this cup pass,” and cannot see

    The purpose in Gethsemane.
    We all have our personal hardships, whether they be giant fish, sharks (I've met a few in my life, mostly human), jobs, physical problems, relationships, or any number of other trials in our lives. Not giving up, enduring with dignity, doing your best, reeling in that fish, battling those relentless sharks -- how we handle our troubles makes a huge difference, both to those around us and, perhaps mostly, to ourselves. ...more

  • Ian "Marvin" Graye

    The Old Man and the Allegory

    This book might just be an allegory of Darwinist Capitalism and the survival of the most aggressive and hungry in the world of corporate enterprise and rivalry.

    Hey, What's the Big Idea?

    It describes what it feels like to have one big idea or to invent something for which the market is not ready.

    You struggle and wrestle with your "big fish" for ages, until in your mind you have caught it and perfected the way to reel it in, nobody is watching when you start the journey
    ...more

  • Fernando

    Cuando yo era chico, a la edad de diez años, acostumbraba a acompañar a mi papá a pescar. A mí no me gustaba la pesca, pero me encantaba verlo a él en todo el esplendor de su pasión. Mi padre era carpintero, pero los domingos acostumbraba a subir a su lancha “Gui-Fer II” que había reconstruido (era un bote de salvamento de un viejo barco pesquero llamado "Cristo Rey") y pasaba toda la mañana y la tarde pescando en su querida laguna “Brava”.

    Una tarde, nos llevó a un lugar más lejano llamado “La c
    ...more

  • Will Byrnes

    It is intimidating to offer a truly critical look at such a classic, so we will ease into it with a few images.

    The GOP has offered us a ready-made item to begin this list, and yes, I know that John Stewart already snagged this one and threw it back.



    I turned up a visual art concept that fits in, for a restaurant based on EH themes:

    Although I did not sit for this photo, the resemblance is indeed striking

    And, of course



    The Old Man and the Cee Lo.

    I suppose am certain there are plenty more images one

    He was an old man who fished alone in a skiff in the Gulf Stream and he had gone eighty-four days now without taking a fish. In the first forty days a boy had been with him. But after forty days without a fish the boy’s parents had told him that the old man was now definitely and finally salao, which is the worst form of unlucky.
    So opens The Old Man and the Sea, the book, we hear tell, that convinced the Nobel committee to reel in EGH with the biggest literary hook of them all. Santiago is an old, unlucky, but skilled Cuban fisherman. He has an able assistant, the young Manolin. The lad is not a blood relation, but he sees a father figure in the old man, and he may be a younger reflection of the old man himself. Maybe Santiago sees himself in the young man and takes some strength from that. Like the best sort of father, he teaches the boy to fish rather than fishing for him. But Santiago’s ill fortune has marked him as someone to be avoided and Manolin’s parents have put the kibosh on their professional association. The old man is determined to salvage his reputation, and his honor, and bring in some money by going farther out than the other fishermen are willing to sail, in search of redemption. No herald calls him to action. No dramatic event sparks him to excessive risk. It is an internal challenge that powers his engines. But it is a quest nonetheless on which Santiago embarks.

    Any time there are fish involved, one might presume a degree of soul saving. I do not know enough Hemingway to have a take on whether or not that figured here. I raise it only as a passing thought. But the second sentence of the book offers a hint. “In the first forty days…”clearly places Santiago’s travails alongside another person who spent forty days in a different barren environment. It was after being baptized that Jesus spent his time in the desert, preparing for what awaited. Is Santiago to be tested here? Will he be offered a route away from his difficult path?

    The waters are becalmed. Nothing moves. A moment, then, for a digression. OK, let’s try some simple arithmetic, if Jesus, at age 30, spent 40 days in the desert, and Santiago has gone 84 days in his version of the desert, just how old is the old man? 63, according to my calculations. Possible. I do not recall seeing an actual age noted, so I am gonna go with that. I know you guys will let me know if an actual age is revealed somewhere and my squinty geezer eyes missed it. Done. I can feel a slight breeze beginning to flutter the sail.

    Some sort of religion seems to flow through this fish tale. Not only are we sprinkled with forty-day references, but Santiago discusses sin. In his struggles he suffers physical damage in which some might see an echo of Calvary. But I think that is a stretch, personally. So, we have a bit of religion, and a quest. What is Santiago questing for? Redemption would fit in nicely. Having failed for a long time, he feels a need to redeem himself in the eyes of his community. Maybe not a religious thing, per se, but swimming in the same waters. And speaking of religion, water as a baptismal element is always a possibility, although somewhat diluted here, as Santiago makes his living on the water.

    The old man is strong, skilled and determined. Maybe it is his character that is at issue. Maybe somehow, taking on this challenge is a way to prove to himself that he is truly a man. He goes about his business, and his fishing is his fate, maybe even his life. It is in how he handles himself when faced with this challenge that will show us the sort of person he is, a common Hemingway theme, and he does just that.

    This is a very short novel, more, maybe, a novella or large short story. But it has the feel of a parable. There is definitely something going on here even if it keeps slipping out of my analytical net.

    I was reminded of another well-known fish story, Moby Dick (really, allow a little literary license here people. Yes I know the whale is not a fish. Geez.). Whereas in that one, the fisherman, Ahab, sets himself against the whale, and therefore either fate or god, seeing a personal enemy, Santiago sees the fish as his brother, a fellow creature in the universe acting out his part. The challenge is always about oneself and not about the external enemy, or rival. In fact, the fish and Santiago are both victimized, together, by the sharks that feast on his catch.
    Then he was sorry for the great fish that had nothing to eat and his determination to kill him never relaxed in his sorrow for him. How many people will he feed, he thought. But are they worthy to eat him? No, of course not. There is not one worthy of eating him from the manner of his behaviour and his great dignity.
    One might be forgiven for seeing here a possible reference to catholic communion and the relative merit of so many of those who receive. Is the fish (a Christian symbol if there ever was one) meant to be Jesus or some other form of deity, as Moby was?

    Could it be that Hemingway’s notion of religion is less Christian and more a sort of materialist (as in non-spiritual, not as in accumulating stuff) philosophy? Lacking the proper tackle for that I will leave such considerations to those who have spent more time than I trolling Hemingway’s waters.

    The writing is mostly either third-person description or the old man’s internal, and sometimes spoken, dialogue. Regardless of the literary ambitions splashing about here, the story is about a very sympathetic character. Santiago is a man not only of physical strength, but moral character. He is not portrayed as a saint, but as a simple man, maybe even, in a way, an ideal man in his simplicity. He knows his place in the world, faces the challenges that world presents to him and using only his skill, intelligence, strength and determination, overcomes (or not). It is easy to climb on board as a Santiago supporter. He is a fellow who is very much a part of the world, even as he contemplates larger things.

    The Old Man and the Sea is a small story, but it is a whale of a tale. If you have not fished these waters before, don’t let this be one of those that got away.

    WB32

    ==============================UPDATES

    1/5/13 - Jeffrey Keeten sent along this amazing link. Gary Wyatt had shared it with him. It will definitely make you smile

    6/20/13 - I discovered that one of the images I used had vanished into the ether, so I substituted another ...more

  • Greg

    Sad book. Read it, but know it is sad.

    This is probably written at about a 4th grade reading level, and the audience is at least that broad.

    I'll spare you the christ imagery chit-chat.

    Why did Ernest Hemingway cross the road?

    To die. In the rain.