Read When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi Online

When Breath Becomes Air

For readers of Atul Gawande, Andrew Solomon, and Anne Lamott, a profoundly moving, exquisitely observed memoir by a young neurosurgeon faced with a terminal cancer diagnosis who attempts to answer the question What makes a life worth living?At the age of thirty-six, on the verge of completing a decade's worth of training as a neurosurgeon, Paul Kalanithi was diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer. One day he was a doctor treating the dying, and the next he was a patient struggling to live. And just like that, the future he and his wife had imagined evaporated. When Breath Becomes Air chronicles Kalanithi's transformation from a nave medical student "possessed," as he wrote, "by the question of what, given that all organisms die, makes a virtuous and meaningful life" into a neurosurgeon at Stanford working in the brain, the most critical place for human identity, and finally into a patient and new father confronting his own mortality. What makes life worth living in the face of death? What...

Title : When Breath Becomes Air
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 25899336
Format Type : Kindle Edition
Number of Pages : 208 pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

When Breath Becomes Air Reviews

  • Jen

    Unforgettable is what Verghese says in his foreword. I agree and am fighting for my own breath to write my thoughts about this stunning memoir that has left me gasping for air. The writing. The emotion. The beauty in the darkness of dying.

    I mourn the death of this writer, a surgeon of great potential. A doctor of great compassion. But the message he has left us is quite eloquently simple: make life as meaningful as you can in the time you have. Be grateful.

    The touching epilogue his wife Lucy w
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  • Seemita

    [Originally appeared here (with edits): http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/li...]

    It has been a few days since I turned the last page of this book. But the numbness reappears the instant I allow the pages to unfold in my memory. The silence which suddenly parts to let these memories seep in and cloud my vision, fills the air. Even as I grapple to make ‘sense’ of what it means to lose a dear, dear one, I, ironically, already know that very ‘sense’ to be ephemeral. No part of my being accepts death
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  • Justin

    I read this almost two months ago and realized I never reviewed it. When I finished the book, I just couldn't review it. It's a small book, but it's powerful. I didn't shed any tears at the end of it, but I remember sitting there physically shaking and feeling really numb and tingly. A book has never impacted me that way before, and I'm not even sure why I read the book in the first place since I knew what I was getting myself into.

    Wait, I know why I wanted to read it. It was very therapeutic f
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  • Linda

    "To begin with -- or, maybe, to end with --I got to know Paul only after his death. I came to know him most intimately when he'd ceased to be." (Abraham Verghese)

    And we, for the most part, can actually say the same thing about Paul Kalanithi. We've come to know of him only after he had left this world of ours. Ironically, I write this on March 9th, the one-year anniversary of his passing.

    Paul Kalanithi: son, husband, father, brilliant surgeon. He was a healer whose very existence gave hope to so
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  • Maxwell

    I don't think you should read this book because the story of an incredibly gifted man who had his life taken away at such a young age might give you the motivation to live life more fully. I think you should read this book because that talented, inspiring man has incredibly important things to say derived from his own experiences, and it's important to listen and learn from them.

    Read this book with the knowledge that you might not always be able to understand everything someone goes through, bu
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  • Iris P

    Sharing this interesting New York Times interview with Dr. Lucy Kalanithi.

    She sounds like a very special person too:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/26/hea...

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    Upgrading this to 5 stars, not sure why I didn't before

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    After finishing this profound, emotional memoir I feel like I lost a good friend.

    Thank you Paul Kalanithi for this beautiful gift you left for us, wherever you are...



    Paul Kalanithi & Baby Ca
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  • Lindsay - Traveling Sister

    4.5 stars! What an emotional book! Dr. Paul Kalanithi was a neurosurgical resident entering his final year of training when he was diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer. This memoir is Paul's story for his daughter, Cady, who was 8 months old when he passed away, just 22 months after his cancer diagnosis. Among other things, Paul writes about his career, his love for his family, his views on the 'doctor and patient relationship' and his eventual transistion from doctor to patient.

    Something that r
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  • Aisling

    Oh dear. I was always told not to speak ill of the dead. It feels awful to give a three star rating to a nice guy (by all accounts) who is now dead. But I simply did not find this book compelling or insightful enough. It is mildly interesting to learn about neurosurgery as a specialty and to read the author's thoughts as he faced diagnosis, illness and then death. I always felt that the author was holding back; that it was too clinical, too calm, just not passionate enough. The first time I felt ...more