Read The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (The Adventures of Tom and Huck #2) by Mark Twain Online

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (The Adventures of Tom and Huck #2)

A nineteenth-century boy from a Mississippi River town recounts his adventures as he travels down the river with a runaway slave, encountering a family involved in a feud, two scoundrels pretending to be royalty, and Tom Sawyer's aunt who mistakes him for Tom. ...

Title : The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (The Adventures of Tom and Huck #2)
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780142437179
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 327 pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (The Adventures of Tom and Huck #2) Reviews

  • Apatt

    Now, how in the nation is a body going to start this review? Well, I'll be ding-busted!

    I usually don’t like reading colloquial prose style, accented dialogue and dialects. All too often they require additional effort to decipher and are just plain irritating. However, I have to make an exception for Mark Twain because he does it better than anybody else I can think of. There is never any confusion about the meaning and his colloquial narrative style and dialogue add a great deal of humour, charm
    ...more

  • Amanda NEVER MANDY

    The Adventures of Tom Sawyer opened the door to this book, my favorite of the two. I’ve never been a fan of the leader of the pack, I’ve always been drawn to the quieter buddy. Not the buddy that blindly follows but the thinking man, the one that sits back to watch and learn from the things he sees before him.

    I adore Huck for how he handles the life lessons that have been dealt to him and those around him. At first he is afraid to stand on his own two feet, quick to yes sir and do what isn’t alw
    ...more

  • Glenn Sumi

    Why have I never read Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn before? Was it Twain’s copious use of the N word? (I vaguely recall a primary school teacher abruptly halting a class read-aloud session, perhaps because of that.) Was it the air of earnest solemnity that surrounds so-called classics? Sheer laziness?

    No matter. I’ve read it now, and I’ll never be the same again. Hemingway was right when he said (and I’m paraphrasing) all American literature comes from Huck Finn. While it’d be entertaining to re

    You don’t know about me without you have read a book by the name of The Adventures Of Tom Sawyer; but that ain’t no matter. That book was made by Mr. Mark Twain, and he told the truth, mainly. There was things which he stretched, but mainly he told the truth. That is nothing. I never seen anybody but lied one time or another, without it was Aunt Polly, or the widow, or maybe Mary. Aunt Polly – Tom’s Aunt Polly, she is – and Mary, and the Widow Douglas is all told about in that book, which is mostly a true book, with some stretchers, as I said before.


    Everything to come is in those opening lines, penned in that distinct, nearly illiterate yet crudely poetic voice. You get a sense of Huck’s humility (compared to Tom Sawyer’s braggadocio); his intelligence; a cute postmodern nod to the author; the idea that storytelling contains “stretchers” but can also tell “the truth”; and the fact that everyone lies, including Huck. Especially Huck. He gets into so many tight spots that part of the joy is wondering how he’ll get out of them.

    The outlines of the plot should be familiar: Huck, a scrappy, barely literate boy, flees his abusive, alcoholic father by faking his death and travelling the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers with Jim, an escaped slave, on a raft.

    Huck's gradual awakening to Jim's plight is subtle and touching, never sentimental. In a sense the book chronicles his growing conscience. And the colourful characters he and Jim meet and the adventures they have add up to a fascinating, at times disturbing look at a conflicted, pre-Civil War nation.

    We meet a Hatfields vs. McCoys type situation; a group of rapscallions who put on a vaudeville-style act and try to fleece rubes; a scene of desperation and danger on a collapsed boat. We witness greed, anger and most of the other deadly sins – all from a little raft on the Mississipi. And before the midway point, we see the toll that a cruel joke can have on someone’s feelings.

    To a contemporary reader, some of the humour can feel a little forced, and the gags do get repetitive, particularly when Huck’s savvier, better-read friend Tom enters the scene.

    And then comes a passage like this:

    When I got there it was all still and Sunday-like, and hot and sun-shiny; the hands was gone to the fields; and there was them kind of faint dronings of bugs and flies in the air that makes it seem so lonesome and like everybody's dead and gone; and if a breeze fans along and quivers the leaves it makes you feel mournful, because you feel like it's spirits whispering – spirits that's been dead ever so many years – and you always think they're talking about YOU.


    Wow. You can see, hear and feel what he's describing. Hard to believe this was written more than 150 years ago.

    In the book's closing pages, Huck tells us this:

    If I’d a knowed what a trouble it was to make a book I wouldn’t a tackled it, and ain’t a-going to no more.


    Well, gosh, Huck, it war worth all yer trouble. We’re darn glad you dunnit. Yessir. ...more

  • Petra X

    This is a rant. I found Huckleberry Finn on my bookshelf had been changed to Huckleberry Finn Robotic Edition. Some very pc "authors" and "editors" took it upon themselves to change the N word to 'robot'. They then rewrote the book to take away any mention of humans and to 'roboticise' words such as 'eye' which becomes something like 'optical device'. The illustrations have also been changed. I have no problem with this, but I do have two major issues with this edition.

    The first problem is with
    ...more

  • Ahmad  Ebaid

    "وأيقنت ألا جدوى من إضاعة الوقت هباء, فأنت لا تستطيع أن تعلم زنجياً كيف يجادل. وعندئذ كففت عن الحديث" هاكلبري فين, بعد أن رفض الزنجي أن الاختلاف بين الأمريكي والفرنسي مثل الاختلاف بين القطة والبقرة




    إذا لم تستطع هذه الرواية أن توصل لك قيمة العلم والمنطق, وخطر العلم الزائف فما الذي سيفعل؟

    إذا لم تشعرك الرواية بكمية الخطر والخداع الذي يتحتم عليك أن تحتمي منه في هذا العالم المحيط بك, فما الذي تبقى لنشلك من سذاجة الطفولة؟

    فكما يقول "بريان ديوننج":

    "قد يكون مارك توين أكثر النقاد فاعلية عند نقده لجهل ا
    ...more

  • Nayra.Hassan

    كله يدلع نفسه ..بالعقل و بالاصول اوعى تدلعها زيادة

    دايما بتفكرني هذه الأغنية ب هاكلبيري فين ذلك الصبي الأشقر المطالب للابد بحق الانسان في ان يكون ملكا لنفسه مهما كلفه ذلك من مشاق و صراعات

    صبي افاق شريد.. يكره العمل المنتظم و الذهاب للمدرسة او الكنيسة !! لا يبغى سوى : حرية منفلتة بلا حساب او عقاب..فيه لمحات من بيتر بان الصبي الابدي

    نصيبه من العلم محدود.. و من التربية معدوم♨

    ..ترق له ارملة و تتبناه ..و لكنه يتبطر على حياة الدعة و الشبع المصحوب بالادب و النظام بالطبع..و يهرب مع عبد اسمر هارب. .ليلع
    ...more

  • Ahmad Sharabiani

    825. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn = Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain

    Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (or, in more recent editions, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn) is a novel by Mark Twain, first published in the United Kingdom in December 1884 and in the United States in February 1885. It is told in the first person by Huckleberry "Huck" Finn, the narrator of two other Twain novels (Tom Sawyer Abroad and Tom Sawyer, Detective) and a friend of Tom Sawyer. It is a direct sequel t
    ...more

  • Evgeny

    Review updated on 16.02.2017.

    Ask any person anywhere in the world to give an example of a classic book of US literature and it is a safe bet this one will come out among the top three. The only reason I am going to mention the plot for such famous book is the fact that I always do it; I am not breaking my own tradition in this case. So an orphan boy and a runaway slave travel together in Southern US. One of the most interesting parts of the book for me was gradual change in Huck's attitude towar



    Point --------> .

                    ^

                    |

                    |

                  1 mile

                    |

                    |

                    v

                    O

    You --------->\_|_/

                    |

                  _/ \_



    You missed the point by one mile!!!

    This gives me an excellent opportunity to talk about limited copyright terms (it seems to me we are heading for unlimited extension of copyright). Limited copyright term means that regardless of current political climate and resulting censorship we will always have access to a legal unaltered copy of the book as in this case: public wins.

    A lot of people do not appreciate the book because they were forced to read it in high school. If this was your only reading by all means give it another try to get a fresh prospective.

    In conclusion this novel belongs to a relatively rare category of classics consisting of books that do not feel like you do heavy manual labor while you read them. My rating is 4.5 stars rounded up out of my deepest respect for it.

    P.S. The original illustrations are excellent.

    P.P.S. Project Gutenberg has a copy with original illustrations. ...more