Read Pachinko by Min Jin Lee Online

Pachinko

Yeongdo, Korea 1911. In a small fishing village on the banks of the East Sea, a club-footed, cleft-lipped man marries a fifteen-year-old girl. The couple have one child, their beloved daughter Sunja. When Sunja falls pregnant by a married yakuza, the family face ruin. But then Isak, a Christian minister, offers her a chance of salvation: a new life in Japan as his wife. Following a man she barely knows to a hostile country in which she has no friends, no home, and whose language she cannot speak, Sunjas salvation is just the beginning of her story. Through eight decades and four generations, Pachinko is an epic tale of family, identity, love, death and survival. ...

Title : Pachinko
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 34051011
Format Type : Kindle Edition
Number of Pages : 496 pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Pachinko Reviews

  • PorshaJo

    Rating 3.75

    I had gone back and forth on reading this one. I would get it from the library and return it. But it was a National Book Award finalist, so it should be good. My library got the audio and I had to wait months to get it, so it should be good. It's historical fiction and I love that, so it should be good. Don't get me wrong, I liked it, but I had many issues with it.

    Pachinko tells the story of several generations of one Korean family. You first start out, learning about this family and
    ...more

  • Lori

    Feel like I’ve just read two separate books. I really enjoyed the first half, but not so much the second. The timespan this novel encompasses includes several generations of characters, however, I only really felt connected to the ones from the first part and I missed them in the second. Not crazy about the title & think a better one could’ve work better at representing the subject. I did love learning more about Korea and its resilient heritage. Overall, a good novel. 3.5 stars rounding up ...more

  • Jennifer Blankfein

    Pachinko is just the kind of book I love. It starts in Korea in the early 1900s with Hoonie, a young man with a cleft palate and a twisted foot. Despite his deformities he marries and his wife gives birth to a daughter, Sunja. When Sunja is a young teenager she makes some bad choices and ends up pregnant. The man who is to be the father is already married, and Sunja is ashamed of her mistake; but proud and determined she refuses to be his mistress. A single, kind pastor, sickly as a child and un ...more

  • Thomas

    One of the most brilliant and heartbreaking books I have ever read, I would like to thank Min Jin Lee for writing Pachinko and starting my 2018 with this splendid saga. Pachinko follows four generations of a Korean family who move to Japan amidst Japanese colonization and political warfare. The novel starts with Sunja, the beloved daughter of a poor yet well-respected family, whose unplanned pregnancy has the potential to bring great shame upon her life. After she learns that the baby's father a ...more

  • David Yoon

    Told in chronological order, this book spans 4 generations and nearly a century of time and focuses on Zainichi or ethnic Koreans living in Japan. These Zainichi are essentially stateless citizens registered to Joseon or a unified Korea that hasn’t existed since the Korean War. Up until recently they had to apply for alien registration cards that required fingerprinting every three years and were rarely granted passports making overseas travel impossible. In Japan, ethnic Koreans are seen as sec ...more

  • Rebecca Foster

    Although some of the central events of the novel, like World War II and the atomic bomb drop at Nagasaki, are familiar territory for fiction, Lee prioritizes out-of-the-ordinary perspectives: her Korean characters are first the colonized, and then the outsiders trying to thrive in a foreign country despite segregation and persecution. I recommend Pachinko to readers of family sagas and anyone who wants to learn more about the Korean experience. My only caveat is that the book goes downhill in Pa ...more

  • Lata

    Long, but enjoyable. Though, I probably shouldn't use the word enjoyable to describe the trials and tribulations of the generations of this family that the author follows from the early 1900s to the late 1980s in Korea then Japan. The story follows Sunja, beloved daughter of a poor couple in Korea. After becoming pregnant, a young and sickly pastor offers to marry SUnja and take her to Japan to live with his brother and sister-in-law. There, the family endures racism, poverty, and just generally ...more

  • Jenny (Reading Envy)

    I picked this from Book of the Month last year, and then my in-person book club voted to read it in the 2017-18 season. Since we aren't reading it until June, I was going to wait, but then saw the author would be coming to my town on February 5, and I wanted to go see her read and get my book signed. Then it was included in the shortlist for the Tournament of Books, so basically I needed to read it. It also counts for the Reading Women challenge, as a book on their 2017 shortlist. This checks a ...more