Read White Houses by Amy Bloom Online

White Houses

For readers of The Paris Wife and The Swans of Fifth Avenue comes a "sensuous, captivating account of a forbidden affair between two women" (People)--Eleanor Roosevelt and "first friend" Lorena Hickok.Lorena Hickok meets Eleanor Roosevelt in 1932 while reporting on Franklin Roosevelt's first presidential campaign. Having grown up worse than poor in South Dakota and reinvented herself as the most prominent woman reporter in America, "Hick," as she's known to her friends and admirers, is not quite instantly charmed by the idealistic, patrician Eleanor. But then, as her connection with the future first lady deepens into intimacy, what begins as a powerful passion matures into a lasting love, and a life that Hick never expected to have. She moves into the White House, where her status as "first friend" is an open secret, as are FDR's own lovers. After she takes a job in the Roosevelt administration, promoting and protecting both Roosevelts, she comes to know Franklin not only as a great pr...

Title : White Houses
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780525589921
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 320 pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

White Houses Reviews

  • Karen

    This book is a work of fiction based on the relationship of Eleanor Roosevelt and her long time friend and companion, Lorena Hickock. Lorena’s voice narrates this story.

    They both seemed to be lost souls that found together, what they both never had in life, and it was written in a beautiful and intimate way.

    Thank you to NetGalley and Random House for the advanced copy!

  • Jenny (Reading Envy)

    I was really looking forward to this book. I'm a longtime fan of Amy Bloom, and like how she writes somewhat quirky people inside relationships.

    I like the idea of reading the untold story of the unknown (but open secret) lesbian lover of one of the greatest first ladies we've ever had in the United States.

    But I think the author's lack of experience in writing historical fiction does not serve her well here. The pieces of the story are interesting but yet it is somehow not very well told.

    It ma
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  • Magdalena aka A Bookaholic Swede

    I first read about Lorena Hickok and Eleanor Roosevelt last year when I read Loving Eleanor by Susan Wittig Albert. It's a fabulous book, deep and well researched. And I loved it. So, when I learned about White Houses by Amy Bloom was I curious about how it would be. I'm glad to say that this one is also very good, well-written and engrossing.

    I'm fascinated by the Roosevelt family and even though FDR is my favorite do I find Eleanor Roosevelt to be such an interesting woman. This book is a fict
    ...more

  • Jennifer Blankfein

    I haven’t stopped thinking about this gem of a book, the powerful telling of an unconventional love story by author Amy Bloom. White Houses is historical fiction, based on research and letters exchanged between Eleanor Roosevelt and Lorena Hickok, a journalist who was invited to live in the White House in an adjoining bedroom to the first lady’s room during FDR’s presidency. A story of soulmates – two, independent, bright and powerful women in a lesbian relationship – a hidden secret to the worl ...more

  • Elyse

    The writing by Amy Bloom in “White Houses” is beautiful.....soooo lovely!!!

    We learn a lot about Lorena Hickok, American journalist: her troubled childhood in South Dakota of sexual abuse - abandonment- poverty - and starting out on her own from an early age.

    Lorena also disclosed her relationship with Eleanor Roosevelt. — All from Lorena Hickok’s perspective. Sure feels real to me... but it’s written as fiction. Amy Bloom did tremendous research - she went through three THOUSAND letters alone -
    ...more

  • Esil

    White Houses is a fictionalized account of Eleanor Roosevelt's relationship with Lorena Hickok. The novel is narrated from Hickok's perspective. It's more of a character study than a story. Hickok recounts part of her childhood, and moves back and forth in time, always coming back to the few days following FDR's death. What made this worth reading to me were the writing and the sharply drawn personalities of these characters. Bloom makes it easy to understand what drew these women together and p ...more

  • Betsy Robinson

    After you’ve read a number of books by an author, you may be able to pinpoint where they hit you. For me, Amy Bloom’s luscious writing lands in my mouth. Specifically, my taste buds. And my mouth waters as I read as if I’ve been served my fantasy feast and it’s just for me and I can eat it as slowly or as quickly as I please and make all the private pleasure sounds you don’t make in public because this experience is mine, mine, mine—intimate and private.

    Her new book, like her previous novels Awa

    In grateful Memory of

    Teacher . . .

    Who led a little girl out of the dark

    And gave to the world . . .


    Helen Keller


    Now that I know so much more about Hickok, I understand this quote in my heart.



    Hickok's bio, at that time.

    A Note about Reading a Digital Version

    I bought the Kindle version of this book and I attribute some confusion in following time-hopping transitions to that. I imagine that the design elements—which were in the Kindle version—separating time jumps would have been clearer on a printed page. I've read Bloom's previous novels in hardcover and am fairly sure she used this device in them—delineated by leaders, asterisks, and double spacing—with no confusion. Lesson: real books are almost always a better reading experience.



    Panel Discussion

    I saw Amy Bloom in conversation with Blanche Wiesen Cook, the historian who wrote the biography that inspired Bloom's novel, at Roosevelt House (where Roosevelt and Hick first met). Here's my blog. ...more

  • Roman Clodia

    I said that the Potsdam diner was a delight. She said that after the funeral there was corned beef and cabbage and homemade beer. She said the service was Irish Catholic and heartfelt. I hung up my coat and made a show of taking out my notebook and doing my job, and asking about her husband's ambitions.


    Lordy lord, if you can manage to read such flat, 'told', random prose then you're more tolerant than I am. I'm really intrigued by this relationship between Eleanor Roosevelt and 'Hick', a lesbi ...more