Read The Ship that Never Was: The Greatest Escape Story Of Australian Colonial History by Adam Courtenay Online

The Ship that Never Was: The Greatest Escape Story Of Australian Colonial History

The greatest escape story of Australian colonial history by the son of Australias best-loved storyteller In 1828, James Porter, sailor, chancer, illywhacker, found himself on a ship bound for Van Diemen's Land, having been convicted of stealing a stack of beaver furs. After several escape attempts from the notorious penal colony, Porter, who told authorities he was a 'beer-machine maker', was sent to Sarah Island, known in Van Diemen's Land as 'hell on earth'. Many tried to escape the island; few succeeded. But when Governor George Arthur announced that Sarah Island would closed down and the prisoners moved to the new penal station of Port Arthur, Porter, along with a motley crew of other prisoners, pulled off an audacious escape. Commandeering the ship they'd been building to transport them to Port Arthur, the escapees sailed all the way to Chile. What happened next is stranger than fiction, a fitting outcome for this true-life picaresque tale.The Ship That Never Was is an entertainin...

Title : The Ship that Never Was: The Greatest Escape Story Of Australian Colonial History
Author :
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ISBN : 40545536
Format Type : Kindle Edition
Number of Pages : 468 pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Ship that Never Was: The Greatest Escape Story Of Australian Colonial History Reviews

  • Sasha

    This is a fascinating account of a little known episode in Australian colonial history. Convict James Porter and nine others managed to steal a newly built ship and sail it all the way to South America in one of the most daring and audacious escapes in convict history. It is amazing this story isn't better known given that it was front page news at the time it happened. But this book isn't just the story of a daring escape, it's a look at the conditions of the convicts, the inhumane treatment th ...more

  • Ashleigh

    Review to come on my blog but an intriguing story and part of Australian history I had not previously known about, amongst many others, and highlighted many gaps in convict history that are sometimes left out of lessons.